Resilient Children

Adoption

  

Infant Adoption Program

Families choosing infant adoption through our Arizona adoption agency are stable Christian families who are eager to share their love with a child and prepared for the joys of adoptive parenting.

Our families demonstrate a willingness to build and maintain connections with birth families for the benefit of their child and are committed to honoring the decision of the birthparents by continuing over the years their open adoption covenant.

As part of the infant adoption program families will participate in our education classes. In these classes, families will learn the ins and outs of adoptive parenting, building relationships with practical adoption knowledge with integrate scripture and biblical principles throughout each session.


Open Adoption

CFC adoptions are almost always open adoptions. A fully disclosed open adoption involves a face-to-face meeting between the birth and prospective adoptive parents prior to placement; an exchange of identifying information; and a commitment on both sides to ongoing contact.

The degree of openness in an adoption varies greatly from family to family. Some birth parents want to receive an annual update and pictures while others desire ongoing in-person contact. 


The Infant Adoption Process

Once the forms and application are submitted, an adoption specialist begins meeting with the family to complete the home study process. This adoption specialist interviews the family, receives necessary documents from them and other sources, and writes a home study. This process typically takes four to six months.

Before, during, or after the home study process, the family attends Adoption Education Classes to learn more about adoptive parenting. Once the family is certified to adopt and completes all classes, they are available for placement of a child.

Birth parents typically select a family for their child by reviewing family profiles which prospective adoptive families have created to introduce themselves to birth parents. In most cases, birth parents wish to meet the prospective adoptive families before making a family selection.

Prior to placement of a child, the birth and adoptive families mutually decide on the nature of their on-going relationship. CFC strongly advocates for fully-disclosed open adoptions whenever possible.

After the birth parents finalize their adoption consents, the adoptive parents will sign placement papers and their petition to adopt. A three- to nine-month waiting period follows the filing of the petition.

Christian Family Care’s adoption specialist conducts regular post-placement home visits until the adoption is finalized. The adoption specialist then submits a final report to the Court prior to the hearing summarizing the child’s development and recommending the adoption be finalized. Ultimately, the adoption is finalized by the Court.

If you are interested in adopting one of the many children who are in need of a loving home through Christian Family Care –

  • In Phoenix/Northern Arizona,      call 602 234-1935
  • In Tucson/Southern Arizona,      call 520 296-8255

Email adoption@cfcare.org or submit the Inquiry Form on the Contact page for more information.

http://cfcare.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/10/coa_logo-150x150.jpg" width="150"/>CFC is COA accredited (Council on Accreditation) and Licensed through the state to provide child welfare and adoption services. It is also licensed through the Arizona Board of Health Services as an outpatient clinic.wcase a premium service.


Top 5 International Adoption Agencies


We have compiled what we hope to be a helpful list of agencies that specialize in international adoption. DISCLAIMER: This list is in no way a comprehensive list of all the good adoption agencies in the US. There are plenty of great agencies out there that are not on our list and we kept it to the top 5 simply for the sake of providing parents with a concise list.

We made our selections based on our research of each agency’s reputation, efficiency, and reviews from adoptive parents. Each agency is COA & Hague approved. Best of luck to you and your family as you find the best fit for your needs!

Check to make sure the list is current.

1. Bethany Christian Services
http://www.bethany.org/

  • Offices in 37 states
  • Headquartered in Grand Rapids,      MI
  • Must sign a statement of faith
  • Works in Hong Kong, South      Korea, China, India, Cambodia, Albania, Romania, Bulgaria, Ukraine,      Guatemala, Brazil, Haiti, Colombia, Ethiopia, Uganda, South Africa, and      Zambia

2. Holt International
https://www.holtinternational.org/

  • Offices in OR, WA, CA, IO, NB,      SD, AR, KS, MO, IL, NJ, PN
  • Headquartered in Eugene, OR
  • Works in China, Vietnam, Korea,      India, Thailand, Philippines, Haiti, and Ethiopia

3. Spence-Chapin
https://www.spence-chapin.org/

  • Offices in NY, NJ, CT
  • Headquartered in New York, NY
  • Works in Bulgaria, Colombia,      and South Africa
  • Works will all types of      families

4. Hopscotch Adoptions
http://www.hopscotchadoptions.org/

  • Headquartered in Highpoint, NC,      but will work with families outside of their state
  • Works in Armenia, Bulgaria,      Georgia, Ghana, Guyana, Morocco, Serbia, and Ukraine
  • Works with all types of      families

5. All God’s Children International
https://allgodschildren.org/

  • Offices in OR, WA, MI, OH, KY,      IN, and TX, but will work with families outside those states with a      cooperating home study.
  • Headquartered in WA
  • More than an adoption      agency–AGCI is dedicated to elevating care for orphans around the world.
  • Works in Bulgaria, Colombia,      Burundi, Haiti, China, and the Philippines.

https://adopttogether.org/top-5-international-adoption-agencies/

Display their FAQs

Each state may have different requirements.  Check with your state department for specific details.


Foster Care

Additional Information

  

Foster Care

Steps to becoming a foster parent

  1. Step 1: Go to Orientation. ...
  2. Step 2: Fill Out the      Application and Follow Instructions to Get Fingerprinted. ...
  3. Step 3: Complete Background      Checks. ...
  4. Step 4: Participate in a home      visit. ...
  5. Step 5: Attend Core Training      for Resource Families. ...
  6. Step 6: Receive Your Foster      Care License. ...
  7. Step 7: Placement of Children.

Steps to becoming a foster parent | Alaska Center for Resource Families

https://www.acrf.org/foster-steps.php?tn=3 

 

Do you get paid to be a foster parent? The first thing to understand is that foster parents are not actually paid. They do, however, receive reimbursement that is not taxable income. Monthly reimbursement is meant to be given at the beginning of each new month for the previous month. However, it can take longer based on each state's individual system. May 6, 2015

How Much Do Foster Parents Get Paid? | Adoption.com

https://adoption.com/how-much-do-foster-parents-get-paid 

 

What are the requirements for becoming a foster parent? Basic Requirements. The prospective foster/adoptive parents may be single or married and must: be at least 21 years of age, financially stable, and responsible mature adults, ... allow staff to complete a criminal history background check and an abuse/neglect check on all adults in the household, and.

Requirements for Foster/Adopt Families (TARE) - DFPS

https://www.dfps.state.tx.us/Adoption_and_Foster_Care/Get_Started/requirements.asp 

 

Can you pick the age of a foster child?

The Office of Community Services does its best to match a foster child with a foster family who can best meet the child's needs. Some foster parents prefer to work with teenage children, while others do better with young children. You, however, will be able to specify the age and gender of the child you prefer.

  

Trauma

Trauma Doesn’t Tell Time JUNE 13, 2013

Many frustrated parents regretfully feel as though all the years that their child has spent in their safe, loving home has not made much of a positive impact on the child. This can leave parents feeling bewildered and incompetent. When I talk with parents about how their child’s behaviors are being driven by their earliest life experiences, many are overwhelmed by that idea that everything they have done to provide a safe and loving family has not helped their child let go of those earliest traumas. Despite years of “safe mom” behaviors, the child’s brain still believes “moms aren’t safe” or “moms leave.” Despite years of never going hungry, a full pantry, and never being told “no” to food, the child’s brain still believes “I’ll never get food again” or “Hungry = Starving”. Parents start to feel hopeless and helpless. When will the child FINALLY believe they are safe? Not going to go hungry? Parents feel justifiably skeptical when I attempt to convince them that their 9-year-old child’s meltdown over being told “no” to a snack right before dinner triggers the part in their brain that believes “I’ll never get food again.” How can this be possibly true when the child has not gone without food for seven years AND mom is in the middle of cooking dinner- an obvious sign that food will be plentifully available very shortly.

Traumatic experiences, even the earliest and preverbal traumatic experiences, remain stored in our children’s brains. The normal information processing system that stores memories in the appropriate places in our brain is thwarted by the cascade of hormones and neurochemicals that are released during a traumatic or frightening experience. The memory- along with the images, feelings, and body sensations, remain literally frozen in their nervous system.

We have two types of memories

Simply because things cannot be RECALLED doesn’t mean they are not REMEMBERED by your child’s brain and body. Implicit memory describes how all your child’s memories were stored before 18 months, and most of the memories before 3. Implicit memory includes emotions and body sensations. Your nine-year-old may not recall being left all alone as a small infant but his body REMEMBERS the fear, terror and loneliness[NG1]  when he was all alone, believing no one would ever come back. For experiences that happen past age 3, explicit and implicit memory is BOTH involved with experiences and events. Explicit memory is what we are usually talking about when we talk about memories. Explicit memories are recalled. It’s the image we bring into our head when we think about last Christmas or what we ate for lunch yesterday. When implicit and explicit memory work together, we smile slightly at the positive feelings the memory brings to our body, and we can create a visual image of the memory. Implicit data is stored in our limbic brain (emotion brain)- the same part of our brain responsible for fight/flight/freeze. Our body holds implicit memories even before explicit memory is working. Newborns and even fetuses have experiences encoded into implicit memories. They can’t recall those experiences, but they remember them.

Explicit memory is autobiographical. This is the part of our memory that helps us be oriented to time and place. If explicit and implicit information is appropriately connected, then when you recall your favorite family Christmas at Grandma Smith’s home because you smell homemade cinnamon rolls, your brain instantly knows that Christmas is a memory- it isn’t happening RIGHT NOW. If Christmas at Grandma Smith’s house had not been fully integrated and appropriately stored in your memory processing system, you may be triggered by the sweet smell of cinnamon rolls and your body may feel as though Christmas is happening NOW.

During traumatic experiences, implicit and explicit information may not be linked appropriately. The implicit data does not connect to the explicit data. And (here’s the Important part) this implicit data that isn’t connected IS NOT ALTERED BY LATER LIFE EXPERIENCES. This means that all those years in your safe home does not impact implicit information that isn’t connected to the explicit information. When an implicit memory is triggered and there is no explicit memory to help it understand time and place, your child’s body literally feels like the experience is happening RIGHT NOW.

Trauma doesn’t tell time.  When it gets triggered, it doesn’t have access to information that tells your child “Hey! That happened a long time ago! You are safe now!” Trauma seizes your child’s body in the moment and thrusts them back into those terrifying times when the trauma was happening. This happens in milliseconds.

So, trauma momma, cut yourself some slack! You are not responsible for the disconnect in your child’s implicit and explicit memories. It isn’t fair that your child’s years in your family have not impacted their implicit memories, but it’s also not your fault, or your child’s fault. The silver lining here is that it is very possible, with the right help and support, for implicit and explicit memories to get linked up and for those earliest memories to be stored in the right spot in their brain.

https://gobbelcounseling.wordpress.com/2013/06/13/trauma-doesnt-tell-time/

Long Journey

Danielle Goodwin’s long journey from neglected child to loving mom by Stacey Solie Editor's Note: Whether physical or emotional, benign or malicious, neglect alters the developing brain's architecture and circuitry in profound ways that often lead to physical and behavioral problems throughout life. In the final installment of our four‐part series on The Neglected Brain we watch Danielle Goodwin, abused and neglected as a child, become a capable, loving parent, spouse and political activist. Read Part 1 (http://crosscut.com/2014/12/02/Kidsatrisk/122855/the‐ neglected‐brain‐1‐stacey‐solie/), Part 2 (http://crosscut.com/2014/12/03/Kidsatrisk/122983/neglected‐brain‐2‐stacey‐solie/)and Part 3 (http://crosscut.com/2014/12/04/Kidsatrisk/123014/fixing‐neglected‐brain‐3‐stacey‐solie/). 

 

Read more about: kids at risk (http://crosscut.com/tag/kids‐at‐risk/) | kids@risk (http://crosscut.com/tag/kidsrisk/) 

ACE Study

http://www.azpbs.org/strongkids/grfx/ACEs_cover.jpg" height="117" src="file:///C:/Users/healt/AppData/Local/Temp/msohtmlclip1/01/clip_image004.jpg" width="90"/>Overcoming Adverse Childhood Experiences (PDF)ACE Posters (PDF)

Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) can last a lifetime, but they don't have to. Early exposure to family violence, abusive treatment, neglect, alcohol and drug abuse, or separated/divorced parents can lead to health and social problems, risk-taking behaviors and a shortened lifespan. Safe, stable and nurturing relationships and communities can break the cycle of abuse and maltreatment.

What is the ACE Study?

The ACE Study is an ongoing collaboration between the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and Kaiser Permanente. Led by Co-principal Investigators Robert F. Anda, MD, MS, and Vincent J. Felitti, MD, the ACE Study is perhaps the largest scientific research study of its kind, analyzing the relationship between multiple categories of childhood trauma (ACEs), and health and behavioral outcomes later in life.

For more about the ACE Study, visit cdc.gov/ace/

 

What's an ACE?

Growing up experiencing any of the following conditions in the household prior to age 18:

  • Recurrent physical abuse
  • Recurrent emotional abuse
  • Contact sexual abuse
  • An alcohol and/or drug abuser      in the household
  • An incarcerated household member
  • Someone who is chronically depressed,      mentally ill, institutionalized, or suicidal
  • Mother is treated violently
  • One or no parents
  • Emotional or physical      neglect 

The ACE Score

The ACE Study used a simple scoring method to determine the extent of each study participant's exposure to childhood trauma. Exposure to one category (not incident) of ACE, qualifies as one point. When the points are added up, the ACE Score is achieved. An ACE Score of 0 (zero) would mean that the person reported no exposure to any of the categories of trauma listed as ACEs above. An ACE Score of 9 would mean that the person reported exposure to all the categories of trauma listed above. The ACE Score is referred to throughout all the peer-reviewed publications about the ACE Study findings. 

There are additional resources on trauma.   Check your local library or google

CASA

Mission

  

About Us

Mission: The National Court Appointed Special Advocate Association, together with its state and local member programs, supports and promotes court-appointed volunteer advocacy so every abused or neglected child in the United States can be safe, have a permanent home and the opportunity to thrive. Read more about us or download our latest brochure (PDF).

How Do CASA/GAL Volunteers Help Children?

CASA/GAL volunteers are appointed by judges to watch over and advocate for abused and neglected children, to make sure they don’t get lost in the overburdened legal and social service system or languish in inappropriate group or foster homes. Volunteers stay with each case until it is closed and the child is placed in a safe, permanent home. For many abused children, their CASA/GAL volunteer will be the one constant adult presence in their lives.

Independent research has demonstrated that children with a CASA/GAL volunteer are substantially less likely to spend time in long-term foster care and less likely to reenter care. Read more evidence of effectiveness.

Who Are CASA/GAL Volunteers?

Last year, more than 76,000 CASA and guardian ad litem (GAL) volunteers helped more than 251,000 abused and neglected children find safe, permanent homes. CASA/GAL volunteers are everyday citizens who have undergone screening and training with their local CASA/GAL program.

Who Are the Children CASA/GAL Volunteers Help?

Judges appoint CASA volunteers to represent the best interests of children who have been removed from their homes due to abuse or neglect. Each year, more than 600,000 children experience foster care in this country. Because there are not enough CASA/GAL volunteers to represent all of the children in care, judges typically assign CASA /GAL volunteers to their most difficult cases. Read the stories of young people whose lives were changed by the support of a CASA/GAL volunteer. 

How Do CASA/GAL Volunteers Help Children?

CASA/GAL volunteers are appointed by judges to watch over and advocate for abused and neglected children, to make sure they don’t get lost in the overburdened legal and social service system or languish in inappropriate group or foster homes. Volunteers stay with each case until it is closed and the child is placed in a safe, permanent home. For many abused children, their CASA/GAL volunteer will be the one constant adult presence in their lives.

Independent research has demonstrated that children with a CASA/GAL volunteer are substantially less likely to spend time in long-term foster care and less likely to reenter care. Read more evidence of effectiveness.

Who Are CASA/GAL Volunteers?

Last year, more than 76,000 CASA and guardian ad litem (GAL) volunteers helped more than 251,000 abused and neglected children find safe, permanent homes. CASA/GAL volunteers are everyday citizens who have undergone screening and training with their local CASA/GAL program.

Who Are the Children CASA/GAL Volunteers Help?

Judges appoint CASA volunteers to represent the best interests of children who have been removed from their homes due to abuse or neglect. Each year, more than 600,000 children experience foster care in this country. Because there are not enough CASA/GAL volunteers to represent all of the children in care, judges typically assign CASA /GAL volunteers to their most difficult cases. Read the stories of young people whose lives were changed by the support of a CASA/GAL volunteer. 

Who Are CASA/GAL Volunteers?

Last year, more than 76,000 CASA and guardian ad litem (GAL) volunteers helped more than 251,000 abused and neglected children find safe, permanent homes. CASA/GAL volunteers are everyday citizens who have undergone screening and training with their local CASA/GAL program.

Who Are the Children CASA/GAL Volunteers Help?

Judges appoint CASA volunteers to represent the best interests of children who have been removed from their homes due to abuse or neglect. Each year, more than 600,000 children experience foster care in this country. Because there are not enough CASA/GAL volunteers to represent all of the children in care, judges typically assign CASA /GAL volunteers to their most difficult cases. Read the stories of young people whose lives were changed by the support of a CASA/GAL volunteer. 

Who Are the Children CASA/GAL Volunteers Help?

Judges appoint CASA volunteers to represent the best interests of children who have been removed from their homes due to abuse or neglect. Each year, more than 600,000 children experience foster care in this country. Because there are not enough CASA/GAL volunteers to represent all of the children in care, judges typically assign CASA /GAL volunteers to their most difficult cases. Read the stories of young people whose lives were changed by the support of a CASA/GAL volunteer. 

CASAs are nation wide and there are more children than advocates.  Contact your state children services department and volunteer today.